NI News: Gareth Appointed FMM Leading Tip as Keith Retires/ Matt a Hit at Blackthorn/ Stormont Certificates

At a celebratory function in the Dunadry Inn last weekend, Field Marshal Montgomery Pipe Band announced that leading drummer Keith Orr had decided to stand down and that his replacement would be drum corps member Gareth McLees. This brings to an end one of the most successful partnerships in pipe band history. Keith and P/M Richard Parkes have shared in around fifty RSPBA Major Championship successes. This includes 11 World,…

History: P/M Speedy, Scots Guards, and a Libyan Band he Trained During WW2

Further to researcher Liz Gardner’s article on the unknown Libyan Pipe Band, I can forward the following information. The band was known as the Senoussi Pipe Band of the Cyrenaican Defence Forces and was taught by Pipe-Major William Speedy of the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards.  By Ron Abbott Pipe-Major 3184097 William Butler ‘Jock’ Speedy was born in Polwarth [near Duns, Scottish Borders] in 1902 and died in London in 1969.  He was…

Winter Storm Results

This competition was held in Kansas City on January 13. It attracted a very large entry in all categories. Andrew Carlisle, Northern Ireland and Pittsburgh, was the aggregate winner in the professional class. In addition to other prizes, Andrew (pictured) was awarded $1,500 for travel to Scotland to compete, or to travel back to Winter Storm 2024. Gold Medal Piobaireachd 1 Andrew Carlisle2 Nick Hudson3 Andrew Lewis4 Alastair Lee5 Derek Midgley6…

P/M Iain Robertson 1976-2023: A Tribute

It was with great sadness I heard of the passing of my friend Pipe Major Iain Mitchell Robertson. Iain died peacefully at his home in Palmerston North, New Zealand, on Saturday, 14th December, after a long battle with cancer. He was 46. Affectionally known as ‘Robbo’ by most, he was one of New Zealand’s top solo pipers, judges, teachers, and a long-time member and Pipe Major of the Grade 1 New…

Review: Recording the Folklore and Pipe Music of Nova Scotia

Twenty five years ago Professor Dan MacInnes gave the annual John MacFadyen Memorial Lecture. His subject was piping in Nova Scotia and the wider Canadian Maritimes. The winters were so severe for the first settlers, said the professor, that hardly a bagpipe survived. They literally cracked up – no doubt along with some of the early adventurers. By Robert Wallace They had never experience the biting bitterness of the ‘big…